Treatment for Inhalant Abuse

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You may have come across stories of individuals using household chemicals to achieve highs. Inhaling substances like paint thinner, deodorant spray, or keyboard duster might seem innocuous, but inhalant abuse can wreak havoc on your health and disrupt your life. While many household products offer a quick high through inhalation, the long-term consequences are devastating. Inhalant abuse adversely affects the brain, lungs, liver, and kidneys, and it leads to issues such as memory loss, muscle spasms, and heart problems.

At Moving Mountains Recovery, we offer unwavering support for individuals on the path to recovery from such addictions. Our comprehensive programs, including PHP, IOP, OP, dual diagnosis, and detox, addressed various forms of inhalant abuse. Whether you or a loved one is grappling with an addiction to inhaling toxic chemicals, we are here to help restore your life and well-being. Our dedicated staff understands the complexities of inhalant abuse recovery and is committed to providing personalized care and support every step of the way.

What is Inhalant Abuse?

Inhalant abuse refers to the intentional inhalation of chemicals for intoxication. These chemicals are often common household products that are not meant to be inhaled, such as glue, paint thinners, aerosol sprays, and cleaning fluids. When inhaled, the fumes from these products can produce a euphoric sensation. However, misuse can pose extreme danger and result in severe adverse health effects.

Research consistently indicates that inhalant experimentation peaks during adolescence. Factors such as easy access to household products containing volatile substances, limited awareness of associated risks, and influences like peer pressure and a desire for experimentation contribute to adolescents’ susceptibility to inhalant abuse.

While inhalant abuse is more prevalent among younger individuals, people of various age groups may also engage in this harmful behavior. Cases of adult inhalant abuse exist, often associated with underlying mental health issues, stress, or a history of substance abuse. However, the majority of documented cases involve adolescents and young adults.

What are the Types of Inhalants?

Inhalant abuse includes a wide range of substances, with individuals often gravitating towards common household items that contain volatile compounds. The most prevalent types of inhalants abused can be broadly categorized into three main groups:

Volatile Solvent

These substances release vapors or fumes that, when inhaled, can lead to intoxication. Volatile solvents can pose significant dangers, causing both immediate effects such as dizziness and impaired coordination as well as long-term damage to the nervous system with prolonged use.

  • Glues
  • Paint thinners
  • Degreasers
  • Dry-cleaning fluids
Aerosols

These are chemicals present in spray products where inhalant abusers directly inhale. The compressed gasses in aerosol products, when inhaled, can produce rapid and intense psychoactive effects. However, the potential consequences include respiratory distress, cardiovascular issues, and damage to internal organs.

  • Spray paints
  • Deodorants
  • Hair sprays
  • Vegetable oil sprays
Gasses

Inhaling gasses directly or their fumes, like nitrous oxide, for a euphoric effect is a form of inhalant abuse. However, it comes with severe risks, including oxygen deprivation, which can lead to asphyxiation. Repeat exposure can cause lasting harm to the respiratory and cardiovascular systems.

  • Propane tanks
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Nitrous oxide.

It is essential to raise awareness about the dangers of these specific types of inhalants and to educate individuals on the potential short-term and long-term consequences. Prevention efforts and support systems play a crucial role in addressing inhalant abuse and promoting overall well-being within communities. 

 

Accordion

What are the Risks and Consequences of Inhalant Abuse?

treatment for inhalant abuse

Inhalant abuse poses serious risks and consequences. These chemicals are toxic and can severely damage your body and brain. The signs of inhalant abuse include slurred speech, loss of coordination, dizziness, and irritability. Long-term inhalant abuse can lead to permanent brain damage, hearing loss, and limo spasms.

Short-Term Effects

In the short term, inhalants can make you feel euphoric and dizzy. However, they also have dangerous side effects like nausea, sneezing, coughing, and nosebleeds. High doses of inhalants can even lead to loss of consciousness, coma, or death. These chemicals are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream, so their effects are felt quickly but also wear off fast, leading people to reuse inhalants frequently and in large amounts.

Long-Term Consequences

With chronic inhalant abuse, severe organ and nerve damage can occur. This may include liver and kidney damage, bone marrow damage, and muscle wasting. The heart, lungs, and immune system are also often compromised. Permanent brain damage can lead to cognitive impairment, psychosis, and muscle spasms. Hearing loss is common, and limb spasms or paralysis can occur.

The good news is that there are treatment programs specifically designed to help with inhalant addiction. It’s crucial to seek guidance from healthcare experts specializing in treating inhalant addiction to identify the most appropriate approach tailored to individual needs.

Can I Overdose from Inhalant Abuse?

Inhalant abuse can result in severe adverse health outcomes, including overdoses and fatalities.  The chemicals in many common household products that people inhale to get high can disrupt the oxygen supply to vital organs like the heart, lungs, and brain.

How Overdoses Happen

When you inhale chemicals like propane, butane, and acetone, they are rapidly absorbed into your bloodstream and tissues. Your body struggles to metabolize these harsh chemicals, and they build up quickly. High concentrations can overload your respiratory system, cardiovascular system, and central nervous system, leading to dangerous complications like suffocation, heart failure, and seizures.

The risks are especially high if you’re a long-term inhalant abuser or if you inhale a large amount of chemicals in a short period of time. However, even a single inhalant session could potentially be lethal, depending on the types of chemicals involved and how much you inhale. Certain indicators of an overdose include the following:

  • Loss of consciousness or unresponsiveness. The person becomes unconscious and does not respond to stimuli.
  • Slowed or stopped breathing. Respiratory function is impaired, leading to a decrease or cessation of breathing.
  • Slow or irregular pulse. The heartbeat becomes abnormally slow or exhibits irregular patterns.
  • The individual experiences forceful expulsion of stomach contents.
  • Hallucinations or delusions. Perceptions or beliefs that are not grounded in reality, often involving distorted sensory experiences.
  • Muscle spasms or twitching. Involuntary contractions or movements of muscles, indicating neurological distress or malfunction.
  • Pale or clammy skin. A noticeable change in skin color or texture, suggesting poor circulation or shock.
  • Dilated pupils. The pupils may appear unusually large, which can be a sign of central nervous system depression.
  • Uncontrolled, sudden movements or convulsions due to abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

If someone exhibits these symptoms after abusing inhalants, call 911 immediately. They need emergency medical care to avoid long-term injury or death.

Getting Treatment for Inhalants at Moving Mountains

Moving Mountains provides a comprehensive array of treatment options tailored to address inhalant addiction, recognizing the diverse needs of individuals seeking recovery. Our commitment to facilitating healing journeys is reflected in the range of programs offered, each designed to cater to varying levels of addiction severity and the presence of co-occurring mental health conditions.

Partial Hospitalization (PHP)

For individuals requiring a more intensive level of care, PHP offers a structured and supportive environment during the day, allowing participants to return home in the evenings. This program is appropriate for individuals grappling with moderate-to-severe inhalant addiction.

Intensive Outpatient (IOP)

IOP provides a step-down level of care, offering flexibility for individuals who may not require full-day supervision. It allows participants to attend therapy sessions and receive support while still maintaining certain aspects of their daily routine. This option is beneficial for those with a moderate level of addiction.

Outpatient (OP)

IOP provides a step-down level of care, offering flexibility for individuals who may not require full-day supervision. It allows participants to attend therapy sessions and receive support while still maintaining certain aspects of their daily routine. This option is beneficial for those with a moderate level of addiction.

Dual Diagnosis Programs

Recognizing the interplay between substance abuse and mental health, our dual diagnosis programs address co-occurring conditions. This integrated approach ensures that both the addiction and any underlying mental health issues are treated concurrently, promoting comprehensive recovery.

Detox

In addition to our diverse treatment options, Moving Mountain’s detox center in NJ recognizes the crucial role of detoxification in the early stages of overcoming inhalant addiction. Our comprehensive approach to recovery includes a dedicated detoxification process designed to safely and comfortably guide individuals through the initial phases of withdrawal.

Therapies

In addition to our diverse treatment options, Moving Mountain’s detox center in NJ recognizes the crucial role of detoxification in the early stages of overcoming inhalant addiction. Our comprehensive approach to recovery includes a dedicated detoxification process designed to safely and comfortably guide individuals through the initial phases of withdrawal.

Inhalant Abuse Recovery at Moving Mountains

women with inhalant abuse attending treatment

Inhalant abuse can be incredibly challenging to overcome. Our expert team at Moving Mountain is ready to guide you through a personalized journey to recovery, providing the support and care needed for a brighter and substance-free future. Don’t face this challenge alone – contact us and start your path to a healthier life today.

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